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  • Thanks for attending this year's 2014 Business Development Summit 1/29/2014

    Why come to the BOT tradeshow? Hear what our members had to say.

    The Board of Trade's annual Tradeshow is a fabulous way to make new contacts and expand your business network. Make more then 90 sales call in one day at our annual tradeshow. Don't believe how great it is? Listen to what our members have to say.







  • Share your Boom story with us 1/29/2014

    You may not realize it, but you are part of the Boom. Learn more from our members about how we're all experiencing the Boom in Newfoundland and Labrador. Visit www,betheboom.ca to find out more and share your Boom story with us.






  • Become a valued member of the St. John's Board of Trade 1/29/2014

    The St. John's Board of Trade can offer you and your business a lot of benefits, but don't believe us, listen to what our members have to say.






  • 2013 Business Excellence Awards 12/4/2013

















    The very best of St. John’s entrepreneurship was celebrated at the sold out, 21st annual St. John’s Board of Trade Business Excellence Awards, Dec. 4, 2013.

    “The Business Excellence Awards represent overall achievement across several categories. The recipients have distinguished themselves as achievers at the very highest level during this business year. The recipients of the 2013 St. John’s Board of Trade Business Excellence Awards are:

    Community Impact (20+ employees) = Deloitte LLP
    Community Impact (under 20 employees) = The Idea Factory
    Leader in Growth and Sales = Le Boudoir
    Marketing and Promotional Creativity = Hickman Automotive Group
    Customer Service and Reliability = Service Master Clean of St. John’s
    Workplace Excellence = Grant Thornton LLP
    Entrepreneurial Spirit = Take the Shot Productions
    Community Builder Volunteer of the Year = Keith Butler

    The Business Excellence Award; the most prestigious award given by the St. John’s Board of Trade, recognizes innovation, creativity, sales growth, and the passion for success demonstrated by the annual winner. This year, the Board is proud to shine the spotlight on Take the Shot Productions.

    Click to view photos of this year's event.

    Congratulations to our 2013 Business Excellence Awards winners and finalists!


  • 2012 Business Excellence Awards 12/12/2012
    2012 Business Excellence Awards
     
    The very best of St. John’s entrepreneurship was celebrated at the 20th annual St. John’s Board of Trade Business Excellence Awards, Dec. 5, 2012, with the St. John’s Ice Caps scoring a hat trick.

    The Business Excellence Awards represent overall achievement across several categories. The recipients have distinguished themselves as achievers at the very highest level during this business year. The recipients of the 2012 St. John’s Board of Trade Business Excellence Awards are:


    Our 2012 Business Excellence Awards winners talk about their business success:

    Dallas Mercer Consulting Inc.
    http://youtu.be/j6Fj3xuRVHE

    Brian King, VP Marketing with Johnson Inc.
    http://youtu.be/YFzSxtb1AQs

    Cathy Duke, CEO of Destination St. John's
    http://youtu.be/fguwFCET8WE

    Mark Dawe, COO at the Bennett Group of Companies
    http://youtu.be/R6v6Zpznqvg

    Ron Ellsworth, president of the Ellsworth Group of Companies
    http://youtu.be/Apt0bs3h0xc

    Danny Williams
    http://youtu.be/G7-6ePPBVSg

    Glenn Stanford
    http://youtu.be/XK0HohjKdw8

    Kim Sparkes
    http://youtu.be/bXHkCeHznK4


    Click
    to view photos of this year's event.

    Congratulations to our 2012 Business Excellence Awards winners!

    Stay tuned for more information on the 2013 Business Excellence Awards. It could be your year!


  • The Best and Brightest of our Business Community
  • CBC Small Business Video Series 3/1/2012
    Check out the St. John's Board of Trade's CBC Small Business Video Series on our YouTube Channel.












    Blue Communications.avi
    http://youtu.be/FXfjRVFJG_M

    Blue Communications and Stoggers Pizza are both member companies of the St. John's Board of Trade. Both are locally-owned, small businesses owned by John Drover. We showed this video as part of our Outlook 2012 business development Summit in St. John's NL on Jan. 26, 2012.

    JBT Financial.avi
    http://youtu.be/bqwGg_dE7tc

    JBT Financial Group is a member company of the St. John's Board of Trade. The locally-owned, small business is owned by father and son financial wizards, Bruce and Jim Templeton. We showed this video as part of our Outlook 2012 business development Summit in St. John's NL on Jan. 26, 2012.

    The Newfoundland Chocolate Company.avi
    http://youtu.be/w1LHLuqZyH8

    The Newfoundland Chocolate Company is a member company of the St. John's Board of Trade. The locally-owned, small business is owned by Chief Chocolate Officer Brent Smith. We showed this video as part of our Outlook 2012 business development Summit in St. John's NL on Jan. 26, 2012.

    Whink.avi
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vmocMYBmU4

    Whink is a member company of the St. John's Board of Trade. The locally-owned, small business is owned and operated by young entrepreneur Kim Sparkes. We showed this video as part of our Outlook 2012 business development Summit in St. John's NL on Jan. 26, 2012.

    YellowBelly.avi
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-1lfvMp6fI

    O'Reilly's Irish Pub and Yellowbelly Brewery are member companies of the St. John's Board of Trade. The locally-owned, small business is owned by the fiery Brenda O'Reilly. We showed this video as part of our Outlook 2012 business development Summit in St. John's NL on Jan. 26, 2012.




  • ROCS Staffing Founders Reveal How to Master a Niche Market 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    Brandon Labman and Tom Moore's staffing company, ROCS, thrives in its niche market, staffing entry-level jobs. Here's how ROCS says no to expansion but yes to growth.

    As freshmen in college at George Mason University in 2003, Brandon Labman and Tom Moore's mutual part-time employer asked them to refer other students to fill some empty jobs. They did, and received glowing praise from their employer for the recommendations. The duo put two and two together, and started a staffing company called ROCS (Responsible Outgoing College Students). The idea was simple: Match students or recent college grads with employers looking for entry-level jobs. Today, ROCS is a go-to staffing company in the Washington, D.C., metro area, and has seen an 800 percent jump in revenue growth over the past three years. But the founders discovered an unlikely key to success in a niche market: knowing when to turn down opportunities. Labman and Moore talk with Inc.com's Nicole Carter about starting-up in an unfamiliar industry, being student entrepreneurs, and how they learned to say "no."

    Read more


  • Freelancers, don’t lose track of your spending 8/16/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    If you’re a freelancer, collect commissions, or work irregular part-time hours, your income varies. You could see $5,000 one month and only $500 the next. Income fluctuations make it tough to create and stick to an annual spending plan. Our solution?

    Forget about making one plan and instead opt for 12 monthly plans. According to Dave Ramsey, author of The Total Money Makeover, monthly income minus monthly outgo should always equal zero. A new plan for a new month ensures you’re working with realistic numbers and are better aware of where your money is going.

    Read more


  • Pay Yourself and Prosper 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    Too many entrepreneurs neglect to make themselves a priority in their own business. The entrepreneurial spirit creates resistance to joining the ranks of corporate America because we value our independence and crave financial freedom. Yet the challenge of balancing priorities and making sound choices prevents many small business owners from achieving either. But with vendors knocking on the door and in-laws awaiting their monthly loan payment, how can soloists make their own financial needs a priority?

    Let’s start at the beginning and take a look at some of the common mistakes made by small business owners as they launch and grow.

    Read more




  • Six female entrepreneurs who built their fortunes from scratch 8/16/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Female entrepreneurs often have it tougher than their male counterparts when seeking to rise to the top in the business world. They often face barriers that would make a lesser person give up. These challenges can come in the form of discrimination or having a lack of capital.

    A number of female entrepreneurs have been able to overcome these challenges and rise to the top of the corporate ladder. Let's take a look at six female entrepreneurs who were able to build fortunes without a lot of cash.

    Read more


  • 10 Tips on Hiring for Creativity 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    Creativity is the root of innovation. But how can you find the right kind of inspired individual to bring into your office? We asked some of the country's best creative directors, marketing whizzes, and HR pros for their tips on hiring the most creative individuals.

    Every company wants innovation in one form or another, and innovation comes from creativity. But where does creativity come from? Finding the right kind of inspired individual to bring into your office is sometimes as much a talent as the artistic qualities you're looking for in the first place. Creatives are often a different breed: less worried about profit, less tied into the world of MBAs and bottom lines, and more adept at populating clouds of big ideas and grandiose designs. Whether you're hiring a Web developer, to animators, or creative copywriter, there are a few things you can screen for to make sure you're bringing in the right type of creativity for your company. We talked with 10 expert creative directors, human resources heads, and creative marketing directors to give you their best advice for hiring for creativity.

    Read more



  • Ten must-have technology tools for small business owners 8/16/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    1. A secure IT infrastructure: Network security is essential for all businesses whether they are growing, shrinking, centralizing or decentralizing and in all economic circumstances. Regardless of the nature of your business, there are tangible benefits to housing your infrastructure in a data centre, or better yet, in a managed cloud. By doing so, you ensure your sensitive infrastructure, information and assets are in a secure and backed-up environment and you have the peace of mind that your company information will remain available as well as safe. Most small to medium size businesses cannot withstand a long period of downtime or a loss of sensitive information, so security is critical to your company’s viability.

    Read more


  • Young Brits mean business: eight in ten want to become entrepreneurs 8/16/2011
    Ambition AXA Awards

    Britain is brimming with future entrepreneurs, a new study into young people’s ambitions has concluded.

    According to the survey of 2,000 youngsters, commissioned to support the Ambition AXA Awards, more than three-quarters of 11 to 18-year-olds (77 per cent) say they would like to start their own business in the future. And around half (47 per cent) say that they have always wanted to be their own boss.

    Read more


  • Do Facebook Ads Bring Customers? 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    Start-ups and small businesses are always looking for more customers, and there are a lot of potential customers on the Internet, right? But what online strategy is going to help you to gain the customers you need in a cost-effective manner? Today, let’s dive into Facebook advertising. With 750 million members, and 225 million in the U.S. alone, there’s a large audience to reach.

    Similar to many other online sites, Facebook ads are a marketplace–you’re making a bid about how much you’ll pay to reach people, or how much you’ll pay if they take an action. (See some resources below for more info on how to use them.) There are a lot of people using Facebook to build their brand by increasing the amount of fans on their pages, and that is absolutely a good strategy for many companies. These fans are customers or customers waiting to happen. Fans are great–but what about revenue driven as a result of a specific advertising campaigns? Marketing 101: Your return on investment is the Gross Profit from that campaign minus the expense spent on the campaign, divided by the expense and that gives you a percentage, which you can compare to other marketing expenditures to see what is most effective for you.

    Read more



  • How to Take Advantage of New Federal Contracting Rules for Women-Owned Businesses 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    A decade in the making, the Small Business Administration finally put in place rules for its women-owned small business federal contract program. Here's how you can work it.

    In February, the federal government unveiled new rules to promote women-owned small businesses. Contracts under the Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Federal Contract Program are to be awarded by the fourth quarter of 2011. This should help the government reach its 5 percent goal for contracting to women-owned businesses. (In 2010 only 3.4 percent of federal contracting dollars were awarded to female entrepreneurs.)

    Read more


  • Don’t shy away from the tough questions 8/16/2011
    The Globe and Mail

     Are there any questions?

    We’ve all experienced the silence at the end of a presentation when even those who have concerns about what has been said, or are confused about the content, hesitate to say anything. After all, it’s human nature not to go looking for trouble.

    And it’s not only meetings or interviews in which workers shy away from bringing up difficult issues. New research has found that if people aren’t asked specifically to discuss a problem, they’ll find a way to avoid bringing it up for fear that they’ll be blamed for it or be seen as negative.

    Read more


  • How to Reward Great Ideas 8/16/2011
    Inc.

    Your employees may never say no to a bonus, but that doesn't mean it's the ideal way to credit their work. Examples from Foursquare and other innovative companies show how to make your rewards as creative as the ideas they're rewarding.

    Projet Créatif, video game developer Frima Studio's program for pitching product ideas, requires its employees to work for the company for a year before presenting an independent project. That was too long for David Moss to wait. Less than a year after joining Frima, Moss compiled a creative team to start designing Ravenmark, a mythological adventure for young boys set in fourteenth century Scotland.

    Read more


  • When it comes to a financial plan, size doesn't matter 8/12/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    It’s not the size that matters. It’s how you use it. I’m talking about financial plans.

    Everybody should have one, but one size does not fit all. That’s true whether you are a DIY investor or are using a full service adviser.

    As the financial advice industry evolves, advisers who traditionally provided just investment advice are increasingly offering comprehensive financial planning. Even if they do not have the certified financial planner (CFP)designation, many will have access to internal financial planning support teams or outsource to external financial planners. These plans can vary in length, with some over 50 pages long. So should you feel like you’re missing out if your plan is lacking in girth?

    Read more


  • Almost half of new Canadians feel underemployed 8/12/2011
    Financial Post

    Nearly half of newcomers who have been in Canada for a year or less feel underemployed, a poll suggests.

    The poll, conducted by Environics Research Group for the Royal Bank of Canada, found that 49% of respondents said they felt underemployed, while less than one third of respondents indicated they were working in their chosen field.

    Read more


  • Not all financial advisors are created equal 8/12/2011
    Retire Happy Blog

    For the longest time I was looking for a good personal family doctor. I did not imagine that process would take years but it did. In that quest to find a family doctor, I was reminded of the reality that not all doctors are created equal. Just because they have the same degree and the same education, doesn’t necessarily mean they are all equally good.

    Read more


  • Tumblr a happy medium between blogs and Twitter 8/12/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Over the past six months, there has been a surge in the number of people using Tumblr, an online service that sits between Twitter and a blog.

    Tumblr now generates about 450 million page views a day and 8.5 billion page views a month. This ranks it within the top tier of social networking services, along with Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, WordPress and Blogger (blogs) and YouTube.

    Read more


  • Six levels of leadership 8/12/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    The concept of servant leadership has become popular since it was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in a 1970 essay, but Mitch Maidique, a professor of management at Florida International University, says it still leaves open the question of who you are truly serving: yourself, your group, or society at large? He explores the notion on Harvard Working Knowledge, developing a topology of six levels of leadership, from sociopath to transcendent.

    Read more


  • Balancing risk in today's investing environment 8/12/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    The investment world is once again proving to be a complicated, messy, risky place for investors’ money. Other than under your mattress, is there anywhere safe – let alone profitable – to put your hard-earned dollars? In this month’s Virtual Water Cooler, Globe reporter David Parkinson chats via e-mail with a group of experts to consider the possibilities.

    Read more


  • Retail outside the big box 8/12/2011
    Financial Post

    When Swati Bhagat's local FoodShare pick-up location closed down in her Toronto neighbourhood, she found a convenient replacement - her own stationery and printing shop, Pixel Print. "Most of the people that have come in [for FoodShare] have done some printing with me or recommended me to a friend," Ms. Bhagat says.

    Read more


  • 5 Business Movies That Are Good For, Well, Business 8/12/2011
    Open Forum

    A few months ago, I did a post about the five business books every small business owner should read. I pulled those recommendations from the experts—the founder of a Web startup, an editor at Entrepreneur magazine—and I hope they were helpful.

    Read more


  • This Simple Graph Explains Why Unemployment Refuses to Go Down 8/12/2011
    The Atlantic

    Here's a short story with big implications. In May 2008, six months after the Great Recession set in, a typical family earning less than $90,000 a year spent $105 daily. One year later, in May 2009, they spent $59 a day.

    Then in May 2010, they spent $59 a day. In May 2011, they also spent $59 a day.

    Why is employment stuck above 9 percent? I just told you.

    Read more


  • Filling the ‘hiring hole’ 8/12/2011
    Financial Post

    Canada became the first G7 nation earlier this year to return to pre-recession employment levels, spurred by healthy job growth in the private sector. But it was not just big firms doing the heavy lifting: small businesses went on a hiring spree of their own, and they’re likely to keep on hiring in the months to come.

    Frima Studio Inc., a video game company based in Quebec City, has continually hired new talent in the past few years. The company has grown in eight years to more than 300 employees, and now pulls in development contracts from the world’s top entertainment companies, including Disney, Warner Bros. and Nickelodeon.

    Read more


  • Bank of Canada faces interest rate dilemma 8/11/2011
    CBC News

    The Bank of Canada had been expected to start raising interest rates in September, but is now likely to keep them on hold or even announce a cut, experts say.

    Canada's central bank is due to make an announcement on rates in September, on the heels of the recent decision by the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank to keep interest rates south of the border low and stable for two years.

    Read more


  • Six benefits of starting a home-based business 8/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Home-based businesses are quickly becoming the fastest growing form of business start-ups. Growing your company out of your home allows for flexibility that is difficult when renting or buying office and warehouse space. Although working at home requires self-discipline, the benefits can be substantial - especially in the start-up years. (We provide six tips for creating a winning business in a losing economy. Check out Starting A Small Business In Tough Economic Times.)

    Read more


  • Brendon Burchard, the Millionaire Messenger 8/10/2011
    Inc.

    Some are calling him the next Tony Robbins. Most who attend his conferences claim that it’s a life-changing experience. And no one who has met him will deny the authenticity in which this “Millionaire Messenger” delivers his expertise in hopes of helping others achieve their dreams.

    Read more


  • Small Business Owners Fear Being Unable to Retire 8/10/2011
    Inc.

    Small business owners’ biggest fear? Not having the money to retire, says a new study.

    Nearly two-thirds of small business owners fear outliving the money they need to retire, according to a poll from the Guardian Life Small Business Research Institute.

    Read more


  • If you don’t know, ask a pro 8/10/2011
    Financial Post

    “If you were learning to play golf, would you want to learn from Tiger Woods or some guy who played in high school?” Sprouter’s website poses to perspective users.

    This is the premise of the Canadian startup for startups, a website that features questions from real, information-hungry entrepreneurs answered by a hand-picked team of business experts: successful entrepreneurs, A-list investors, and numerous other advisors, including (full disclosure) a certain weekly Canadian entrepreneurship columnist.

    Read more


  • How business education is blinding us with science 8/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    This year sees the centenary of the publication of the most influential management book of all time, Frederick Winslow Taylor’s The Principles of Scientific Management.

    Taylor’s view was that the problems of management could be solved through science. A century on, that view is still dominant, especially in business schools where management is studied and taught.

    Read more


  • 10 ways to deal with bad apples in the office 8/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Difficult employees come in many forms. They might be complainers, they can be negative and blame others, or be arrogant know-it-alls. They might be argumentative, bullies or even isolationist – but one thing all these personalities have in common is the burden they place on other staff.

    Read more


  • How Do You Know When Employees Need to Get Out of the Box? 8/10/2011
    Inc.

    We’re always trying to push our employees, and for good reason: You want to make the most out of your people not only for their sake but for your business’s as well. But what about those employees who like to be “in the box”? What do you do about them

    Read more


  • Seeking a little help from your friends 8/10/2011
    Financial Post

    When The Beatles recorded With a Little Help from My Friends in 1967, they didn’t have entrepreneurs in mind. But while the term “advisory boards” is often tossed around entrepreneurial circles with little regard to its meaning or purpose, a little help from friends can provide the foundation upon which a structurally sound business is built.

    Complicating matters, however, is that entrepreneurs commonly do not know what makes a good advisory board member, where to find one, how to convince him or her to join or even what purpose that member might serve.

    Read more


  • Steve Lafleur: Only more immigrants can save Canada’s economy 8/10/2011
    National Post

    In his immigration policy remarks on July 19, Minister Jason Kenney acknowledged that Canada would need roughly one million immigrants per year in order to maintain the ratio of working age citizens to retirees. Citing a lack of resources for integrating new Canadians, and a concern that accelerating immigration levels too rapidly could lead to a nativist backlash, he said that it won’t happen.

    While the Minister’s expressed concerns are valid, they pale in comparison to the demographic reality. The proportion of Canadians aged 60 and over is projected to increase from roughly one-fifth to nearly one-third by 2020. Our national debt stands at over $582-billion, and is increasing at a rate of more than $1,400 per second. This burden doesn’t include provincial government debts, or unfunded pension liabilities such as the $748-billion shortfall for the CPP. For those Canadians hoping to start collecting CPP in the next decade, the question shouldn’t be if we can integrate one-million immigrants per year, but how.

    Read more


  • Study Finds More Female Angels Equals Bigger Investments 8/10/2011

    Inc.

    Looking for angel investors? Female angel investors are less risk-averse than previously believed, says a new report.

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that angel-investing groups composed of higher numbers of women made more or bigger investments than those with fewer women. The magic number for increased investments: upwards of 10 percent women.

    Read more

     


  • A broken vow, and wasteful excess, on business subsidies 8/10/2011

    The Globe and Mail

    Ah, summer.

    It’s the season of lakes, loons, lazy days and, of course, federal ministers doling out pork across the land.

    There are almost too many announcements to keep track of these days.

    Here’s a sampling of just one day’s work by the Harper cabinet last week:

    •Transport Minister Denis Lebel hands $225,000 to the Gatineau, Que., hot-air balloon festival as part of an effort to “raise the visibility of Canada’s attractions on the international stage.”

    Read more

     


  • Notable Features Through the Years 8/10/2011
    Inc.

    Inc. magazine editor-at-large Leigh Buchanan gazes back at the past 15 years of editorial content and walks us through the highlights.

    I joined Inc. magazine in early 1997, shortly after the birth of Inc.com. Back then Web sites were still undergoing the transformation from novelty to necessity, and ours was notable for, among other things, being a digital rendering and amplification of the print publication. To those of us in edit, Inc.com was where our stories found eternal life and enduring utility for new generations of readers.

    Read more


  • First impressions count for managers 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Welcome to the firm. Here’s your employee manual, that’s your desk and this is John, your cubicle mate. If there’s anything else you need, be sure to ask. See you around.

    That’s the orientation drill for new employees in many Canadian organizations and it’s destined to leave rookies feeling unsure, out of place and significantly more likely to start looking for another employer, a Canadian study has found.

    Read More


  • How not to get that job 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Sure you want to stand out from a crowd of job applicants, but arriving for an interview in your pyjamas or with a bird perched on your shoulder will get your remembered for all the wrong reasons, career experts warn on a new website.

    Even small mistakes during the job interview can cause professionals to miss out on opportunities. To help applicants put their best foot forward, staffing service Robert Half launched a website (www.roberthalf.com/dont-let-this-happen-to-you) with light-hearted videos depicting interviews that have gone awry, along with tips for avoiding common blunders.

    Read more


  • Get your workforce to lead change 8/9/2011
    Financial Post

    Company name: Nuheat Industries Ltd.

    Headquarters: Richmond, BC

    Employees: 90

    Industry: Manufacturing

    Market: North America

    The challenge: Last year, Nuheat, North America’s leading manufacturer of electric floor heating systems, decided it needed to develop a more effective strategic plan — one that had buy-in from the entire Nuheat team. “We had 35 objectives we wanted to achieve as part of this for this year,” says John Rose, the company’s president and CEO.

    Read more


  • The 50 Songs (and Albums) to Listen to at Work 8/9/2011
    Inc.

    When I was a staff writer at Rolling Stone in the mid 90s, listening to music at work was part of the job description. But back in those days of yore, we had actual [gasp] stereos that played CD's, even at times, cassette tapes!

    But while technology has radically changed, one thing has remained constant: Music in the workplace equals happy time. So whether it's a rainy weekend day or a raucous office party, ambient techno or stone-cold classic rock, music is necessary. Here's what you should listen to while on the job.

    Read more


  • Don't Sell the Fix, Sell the Prevention 8/9/2011
    Inc.

    One of the most common questions I get from business owners comes from people who sell their expertise for a living. These lawyers, web designers, public relations consultants, and plumbers often make a decent living, but usually the business consists of just them and maybe one or two helpers.

    Read more


  • Want to 'get lucky?' It's all about attitude 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    We've all heard the expression "you make your own luck," but in a new book for Harvard Business Review Press, authors Anthony Tjan, Richard Harrington and Tsun-yan Hsieh take this idea to the next level.

    After hundreds of interviews, collaborations and interactions with entrepreneurs, they found that successful business owners tend to be luckier because they have the right attitude; one based in humility, intellectual curiosity and optimism.

    Read more


  • Unpaid interns: working for free 8/9/2011

    The Globe and Mail

    Dan Dolan knew he shouldn’t expect a high-paying job right after graduating from Sheridan College’s postgrad advertising program this spring. His fate was clear: living at home with his parents so he could take an unpaid internship at a small firm in Toronto.

    “That was something [professors] stressed really hard – that we would not get paid,” says the 23-year-old from Mississauga.

    Read more


  • The price of debt: Higher borrowing costs 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Public debt levels have shot up dramatically since the Great Recession and are still rising, especially in the developed economies. Debt ratios have increased in all the G7 countries, and this year the United States is expected to join the ranks of the super-debtors -- Japan and Italy -- as its debt hits 100 per cent of GDP. But, in terms of sheer speed, the United Kingdom grabs the title of plunging into debt at the fastest rate among this group.

    Read more


  • Five factors threatening your dream retirement 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Over nine million Canadians who were born between 1946 and 1964 - aka Baby Boomers - will turn 65, averaging about 1,000 per day for the next 19 years. That means lots of folks have dreams of retirement on their minds. But while those TV commercials make it look worry-free and so appealing - sailing off the island coast or golfing at the country club - making the decision to retire can be a lot more complicated and difficult than the ads would have us believe. Here are several important questions to ask before taking the plunge into retirement.

    Read more


  • 3 Reasons To Love Facebook Fan Page Lurkers 8/9/2011

    10,000 Words

    In the age of Facebook “Likes”, Twitter followers, and channel subscribers, lurkers get a bad wrap.

    A lurker is a user who reads updates, watches videos, or shares a tweet without actually standing up and being counted as a member of the community. They do everything but “like” a page, “follow” a Twitter stream, or subscribe to a YouTube channel.

    Read more

     


  • Simple and low tech – that’s how to move forward 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    There’s some irony in the fact that, in 2011, an age of super-fast computers and ubiquitous broadband connections, there’s more reason than ever to keep websites simple and focused – low-tech, even.

    But with ever-more consumers browsing the Web on small, handheld screens rather than big ones, and search engines more and more at the centre of the consumer’s daily life, a new set of pressures is acting on modern site design. For small businesses looking to take their websites one step forward, here are three factors to consider:

    Read more


  • Boost the mood in the office with these tips 8/9/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Do your employees drag themselves into work? Is office laughter a vague memory? Your employees’ morale may need a boost.

    After all, low morale can lead to poor co-operation, low productivity and increased turnover – and ultimately stop a business reaching its goals.

    Read more



  • How Loyal Are Your Employees? 8/9/2011
    Inc.

    Think "small" means close-knit? Think again: Small business employees aren’t feeling as loyal to their employers as one would think, says a new study.

    Employee loyalty in small businesses has dropped from 62 percent in 2008, to 44 percent last year, according to MetLife's 9th Annual Study of Employee Benefits Trends, released Monday. The New York insurance firm surveyed 1,412 small-business workers for the study. The loyalty rate at large businesses is 50 percent, according to the study.

    Read more


  • Perspectives on small business in Canada 8/9/2011
    CFIB

    To celebrate the Year of the Entrepreneur and its 40th anniversary, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), in partnership with Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Co. and Intel of Canada, Ltd. commissioned a set of two opinion polls through Angus Reid to better understand the public's opinions about small business, entrepreneurship and what it will take to ensure that we maintain a vibrant small business sector going forward.

    Read more



  • Today’s economy blog 7/11/2011
    Sun Life Financial

    Who should pay for prescription drugs?

    Canadians believe their employer-sponsored benefit plan should provide partial coverage of “costly prescription drugs to treat a serious disease such as cancer, diabetes or heart disease.” One hundred per cent of Canadians believe this according to the 2011 edition of The sanofi-aventis Healthcare Survey. Ninety-one per cent of respondents said it’s very important that this coverage be provided and another 9% said it’s somewhat important.

    Read more



  • Does Money Make You Happy? Maybe Not 7/11/2011
    Quizzle Wire

    Many people think, “If I had more money, I’d be happier.” Or, “If I was rich, I wouldn’t have to worry about money anymore.” While it’s true that to some extent, having more money does make you happier, this effect wears off after a certain point, according to a study from Princeton University. Once you’re earning $75,000 a year, additional money does not “buy” additional happiness.

    Read more


  • TFSA Basics: Contributions and Withdrawals 7/11/2011
    Retire Happy Blog

    It’s been just over 2 years since the introduction of the Tax Free Savings Accounts (TFSA) and based on what I see as a financial educator, they are really gaining momentum. Despite the growing popularity, I continue to meet people who don’t fully understand them or worse yet, know nothing about them. This has motivated me to write a few articles on these amazing savings vehicles.

    Read more


  • Why is it so rare to see women in top economics jobs? 7/11/2011
    Globe and Mail

    For decades, the IMF, World Bank and OECD have helped steer the global economy. And they’ve done it largely without women.

    Christine Lagarde’s rise to the top post of a global economic institution has catapulted her into a job no woman has done before, and highlights the maleness of the circle of senior officials at the agencies and central banks guiding the global economy.

    Read more


  • Reach for the next big thing, or die trying 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When businesses consider how they’d like their growth to look on a graph, they picture a nice smooth curve or, better yet, an arrow-straight line. It starts at Day One with zero, and heads skyward.

    But that’s not how high-performing businesses work, says Paul Nunes, executive director of research for the Institute for High Performance at the management consulting firm Accenture. Instead, their growth looks like a series of S-shaped curves, marching ever upward. That shape rings true for every kind of successful business, from Megacorp Inc. to Joe’s Garage, Mr. Nunes says.

    Read more


  • Recession recovery: We’ve only just begun … 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Three years after the onset of the recession, the world economy remains deeply unsettled. This state of affairs should surprise no one.

    Arguably, the most instructive book since the recession – This Time Is Different – has analyzed the history of financial meltdowns going back to the 14th century. What U.S. economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff discovered explains much of what the world faces today.

    Read more


  • Why mindset can trump skill set 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When asked which was more important - mindset or skill set - when choosing who to hire, promote, give a higher raise to and retain in a downsizing, a survey of thousands of companies found mindset was favoured, by an average of 92 per cent of respondents. "Mindset utterly trumps skill set. Not by a little, but by a landslide.

    Read more


  • A ready army of workers awaits online 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Think back to the last time you had a task for which you would have loved to have had an army of workers.

    Perhaps you had to sort through thousands of articles looking for something specific, or maybe you had to transcribe hours of audio recordings. Perhaps you had to check for duplicate records in a database of thousands of entries, or saw an opportunity in the market that would have required you to mobilize hundreds of people to help you in a short amount of time.

    Read more




  • Scion of Newfoundland business dynasty embraced change 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When Albert Hickman died on June 13, newspaper headlines called him a “business icon.” This was shorthand for the resonance the Hickman family name has had throughout Newfoundland for more than a century.

    It all started with a 20-vessel fishing fleet 100 years ago, and grew through an incredible diversification of businesses that included links with such Newfoundland household names as Purity Factories and Fishery Products International. The current enterprise, Hickman Motors, is another household name – in its fourth generation of family ownership. Its genesis was one of the first cars ever driven on the island.

    Read more


  • Does a “Free Consultation” really save you money? 7/11/2011
    Retire Happy Blog

    If you wanted a financial or retirement plan done, who would you go see?

    •Advisor 1 offered a “FREE CONSULTATION”
    •Advisor 2 was a fee only planner that charged $250 per hour with a estimated total cost of $1500.
    There are plenty of advisors who work like Advisor 1. How do they make their money if they are doing this for FREE? It’s simple – they sell products and earn commissions when they sell products whether it’s a mutual fund, GIC or insurance product.

    Read more


  • The tricks that hindsight plays on us 7/11/2011
    MoneySense

    In a recent post on MoneyVille.ca titled “I let an $11,500 stock profit get away“, The Star’s Peggy Mackenzie relates the story of how she invested $550 in what is today Gennum Corporation. Her initial investment has grown to $6,300 over close to three decades — a respectable rate of return — and that’s even before accounting for the modest dividend (the company has paid a quarterly dividend since 1994).

    Read more


  • How Your High School Let You Down 7/11/2011
    Andrew Hallam

    As a high school teacher at a great school, I have to admit that I have one major beef with most high school curriculums: they teach plenty of complicated ideas, but many of them won’t be useful to you when you’re older.

    They do a disservice to their students by avoiding some life enhancing concepts that are as easy to grasp as 4th grade math.

    Read more




  • Secrets of Money and Life Success 7/11/2011
    The Simplier Dollar

    Here are some little thoughts and things that have improved my finances, improved my career, and made my life better over the past decade.

    Don’t throw away your childhood dreams. Find a way to still do them in the spare moments and hours of your life.

    You can never judge a person by their appearance. Wait until you know something of their character.

    Read more


  • Canada slips further in innovation rankings 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Canada is now a mid-level player in the global innovation race, passed by rising powers China and South Korea in some categories and falling further behind long-time rivals such as the United States, Germany, Norway and Sweden.

    In a report being released Tuesday in Ottawa, the Science, Technology and Innovation Council says Canada’s innovation performance has slumped on most key measures in the two years since its last report card.

    Read more


  • Pension plan funding improving in Canada 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Canadian pension plans say their financial status is improving – and a small proportion in the private sector are even reporting funding surpluses.

    A new survey of pension plans by advisory firm RBC Dexia Investor Services Ltd. shows a stronger financial position after years of funding concerns, but also indicates pension fund sponsors remain worried about market risks, particularly the threat that inflation could surge and interest rates rise.

    Read more


  • There’s dumb luck, and there’s real productivity 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Most people want to get rich. In general, there are two ways to do so: being an efficient worker or dumb luck. As it goes for people having higher incomes, so it goes for Canada’s economic growth.

    Canada won the natural resource lottery in the past decade with booming resource prices. In the long run, however, Canada’s economic well-being is largely determined by the effectiveness of its workers, not by luck. Unfortunately, improvements in production per worker, or labour productivity growth, for the provinces during the decade have been very low from an international perspective – behind the United States and the major countries of Europe.

    Read more


  • Strikes loom in Britain over pensions 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    British teachers and civil servants are expected to strike this week despite further talks on Monday between the government and unions over reforming public sector pensions.

    The action will close schools and government offices and could lead to disruption at airports and ports and could be just a taste of wider strikes later this year.

    Read more


  • Business advice, brought to you by the Amish 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Horses, buggies and sage wisdom

    In this post from AMEX's Open Forum, the author explains how Amish farming practices offer valuable lessons for small business owners. Their slow-and-steady approach to agriculture may go against the grain of an industry focused on maximizing production. But paradoxically, it's this same care and attention to long-term goals that will ensure the preservation of land for future generations. And that's a philosophy worthy adopting.

    Read more


  • Ten inexpensive ways to reach your target market 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Looking for ways to increase awareness for your small business but don’t want to blow your budget right out of the gate? Gary Lipovetsky, president of online group-purchasing site Dealfind offers entrepreneurs these solid tips for maximum exposure on minimum investment.

    Read more


  • Almost half of new Canadians feel underemployed 7/11/2011
    Financial Post

    Nearly half of newcomers who have been in Canada for a year or less feel underemployed, a poll suggests.

    The poll, conducted by Environics Research Group for the Royal Bank of Canada, found that 49% of respondents said they felt underemployed, while less than one third of respondents indicated they were working in their chosen field.
    Twelve percent of respondents indicated they felt “locked in” to a job that would not lead them to their desired occupation eventually.

    Read more


  • What ‘I want a raise’ really means 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    In a perfect world, employees would never need to ask for a raise. That’s because all employers should have a clear, well-documented plan for salary increases.

    Sadly, it doesn't always work out that way.

    Read more


  • Why doesn't Canada have more top companies? 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Aren’t we clever? Our Top 1000 lists more than 30 Canadian companies with profits of $1 billion or more in 2010, a remarkable achievement given the worldwide corporate bloodletting since the 2008 financial crisis. Most Canadians know the names of the biggies, from Royal Bank to Rogers Communications, and probably consider them money-spinning proof that we can compete with the best of the best.

    Read more


  • When it comes to a financial plan, size doesn't matter 7/11/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    It’s not the size that matters. It’s how you use it. I’m talking about financial plans.

    Everybody should have one, but one size does not fit all. That’s true whether you are a DIY investor or are using a full service adviser.

    As the financial advice industry evolves, advisers who traditionally provided just investment advice are increasingly offering comprehensive financial planning. Even if they do not have the certified financial planner (CFP)designation, many will have access to internal financial planning support teams or outsource to external financial planners. These plans can vary in length, with some over 50 pages long. So should you feel like you’re missing out if your plan is lacking in girth?

    Read more


  • Want to Grow Your Business With Blogging? Here’s Your Quick-Start Guide 7/8/2011
    copyblogger

    The good folks over at Problogger have released another excellent blogging manual, this time focused specifically on business blogging.

    It’s written by Mark Hayward, a very cool guy who I’ve followed for years.

    Read more


  • Tips for getting the most out of Twitter 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    With a little strategy, Twitter can boost your connections and website traffic.

    I like to think of Twitter as a live networking event where you can jump into a conversation at any time. It’s a great tool, but many use it only for sharing information – not for starting a two-way dialogue. That’s a lot like walking into an event and shouting at people, without listening to their responses. It just doesn’t work.

    Read more


  • Starting a small business easier in Canada: survey 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Starting a small business in Canada is easy - at least compared to the rest of the OECD countries.

    Only New Zealand and Australia beat Canada in an index that measures the time and costs necessary to incorporate and register a new firm, according to an extensive report on entrepreneurship by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development using data from 2007.

    Read more


  • How an introverted manager can step out of the shadows 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    I’ve recently been hired by a new company with a promotion to a managerial job. Because I am quite introverted, it’s going to be a challenge for me to get to know people and make a positive impression quickly. What can I do to heighten my visibility and instill respect without totally stepping out of my comfort zone?

    Read more


  • Company leaders not prepared for future demands, report warns 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Leaders may have been able to get by in the past solely on their abilities to meet the bottom line, demand changes and make difficult strategic decisions. But such a purely strategic approach won’t be enough to survive the management challenges of the next few years.

    What will ultimately separate the great leaders from the rest as the economy recovers will be their focus on people and development of their organizations’ bench strength, according to the survey of more than 12,000 top executives and 1,800 human resources officers worldwide by Development Dimensions International Inc.

    Read more


  • Thrive thrives with Web service for small retailers 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When it comes to Canadian startup hotbeds, St. John’s doesn’t appear often on the radar. So it was attention-worthy when Thrive Software jumped into the spotlight after it was recently named one of 30 finalists in the 2011 Intuit Apps Showcase.

    “We’re a bit of an anomaly,” said Elliot Yeo, who heads up sales and marketing for Thrive. “There are other tech companies in St. John’s but, as far as Web apps go, we’re about it.”

    Read more


  • Time for action on innovation, not more study 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Canada is a country that loves to study things. Commissions, task forces, inquests and panels are a national obsession.

    Look at innovation. Last week, the federally appointed Science Technology and Innovation Council issued its second major report, Imagination to Innovation: State of the Nation 2010.

    Read more


  • When the cheque’s not in the mail, other ways to get paid 7/8/2011

    The Globe and Mail

    The recent strike by Canada Post was obviously unwelcome news for many people who depend on mail service for both personal and professional reasons.

    For businesses, the strike was particularly painful because it meant cheques were not being delivered. No cheques, no money, no good.

    Read more


  • Ten tips for moving from corporate to freelance 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Leaving your current employer and going it alone can be a rewarding, exhilarating experience. But before you venture into the freelancing game, make sure you consider the following:

    Read more


  • Lowering the bar on joblessness 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    The United States’ economic recovery is sputtering and gasping. After a promising start to the year, the key indicators for April and May turned downward. Is the patient in a truly dire state?

    Read more



  • Adjusting unemployment expectations
  • Budgeting for the zombie apocalypse 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    The zombie apocalypse is a simple thing for which to prepare. No, it's not necessarily easy - stockpiling nonperishables, water, guns and ammo is definitely not easy - but it is straightforward. When getting ready for the host of reanimated dead to overtake the world, you need to prepare for survival and self-defense. And your pre-zombie apocalypse budget is the perfect place to start readying yourself in order to survive a zombie-filled world.

    Read more


  • Inbound marketing: The customer finds you 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Unless you're a multinational corporation, chances are you have a limited marketing budget. Any small-business owner would rather have customers knocking on their door than have to spend advertising dollars trying to pull them in.

    Read more


  • Canadian businesses lead world in optimism 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Not only are Canadians polite as a general rule, but they're also optimistic, at least according to the Global Entrepreneur Indicator.

    The WSJ blog In Charge reports that Canadians, Caribbean and Latin-American entrepreneurs have the most positive economic outlook out of 1,200 business owners from 38 countries polled in the survey. In fact, 90 per cent of Canadian entrepreneurs expect improvement in the economy in the coming six months, while the outlook for U.S. business owners is much more dismal, with fewer than 60 per cent expecting improvement.

    Read more


  • Seeking a meaningful life in business 7/8/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    In the wake of the financial scandal, many suggestions for reforms have been put forth, among them a persistent call for business schools to spend more time teaching ethics. But famed psychologist Martin Seligman says that won’t work.

    Read more


  • 10 Keys to Social Media for Financial Advisors 7/8/2011
    AdvisorThinkBox.com

    I just heard Amber MacArthur speak for the first time. She has branded herself as a social media expert and I can see why she has become so successful at it.

    This particular session was delivered to a group of successful financial professionals. Some were traditional financial advisors and others really focused on group benefits and pensions for companies in Canada. None-the-less, social media has not been easy to adopt for the financial community because of both tradition and regulation.

    Read more


  • Pensions in Canada: Defined Benefit vs Defined Contribution 7/8/2011
    GroupBenefitsOnline.ca

    I’m sitting in the garden patio at Langdon Hall in Cambrdge, Ontario with my brain spinning with new ideas because of listening to a line up of great speakers. One of the themes today was a number of presentations and discussions about pension reform and the shifting pension landscape from Defined Benefit pensions to Defined Contribution pensions.

    Read more


  • Dirty Jobs creator on the need for skilled tradespeople in America 5/19/2011
    Mike Rowe, creator of the TV show "Dirty Jobs," testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation on the de-skilling of America, and the way in which skilled manual labor has been undervalued and derided in the USA to its detriment:

    Read more


  • Canadian exports forecast to hit prerecession levels in 2012 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Canada’s exports will return to prerecession levels next year, powered largely by gains reaped from the high price of oil, but a recovery in the long-struggling lumber business is also helping, according to Export Development Canada.

    Read more



  • Globalization and knocking down trade barriers 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    "The Great Crisis of 2008 has forced many of us to re-examine our beliefs about markets and globalization. Do propositions about the gains from market integration survive the reality of market failures? Or might we be better off - as people are particularly prone to suggest in turbulent times - pulling back from rather than pushing forward with integration in order to deal with our problems on a smaller, more manageable scale?" writes Professor Pankaj Ghemawat, about his new book World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve it. His book addresses these questions.

    Read more


  • When minimum wage hikes make no sense 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    My 19-year-old daughter, who is back home from the University of Victoria until September, has found a summer job as a hostess at a well known B.C. restaurant a couple of blocks from our house. She’ll be working four- to six-hour shifts, three or four days a week.

    Read more


  • Dealing with the drama queen within 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Much of the drama in our offices shouldn’t be all that dramatic, when you drill down to the precipitating reasons. But it sure can get in the way of work, as employee fears, confusion and resentment about issues from both their work and outside-work lives spill into the daily routine.

    Read more


  • Debt has become big business 5/19/2011
    Written by Jim Yih in Debt

    There was a time when paying down your debts was good, prudent financial advice that came from the banks, other financial institutions and advisors. It seems times have changed as I am getting more stories of people who are encourage to take on more debt as opposed to less debt. Maybe this is part of the reason debt has hit record levels. Here are few of my favorite examples.

    Read more


  • When push comes to shove 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    You’re in your early to mid-sixties, have just marked your 25-year milestone at the company, are liked and respected by your colleagues, and have always had favourable performance reviews.

    Suddenly your boss is criticizing your work and suggesting your skills no longer match the job. You’re assigned work well below your position – and now you’re getting the idea that you’re being nudged toward the door. What to do?

    Read more


  • Approach colleagues for contributions with care 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Whether it’s cookies or chocolate bars, there are often sweet treats for sale at Harcourt Recruiting Specialists in Edmonton.

    “It's not an uncommon thing,” says Rick Harcourt, president of the staffing company.

    “We have a lot of folks with young kids, and a lot of them are on hockey teams or soccer teams.”

    Read more


  • Ten best small business stories of the week 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Check out the best stories of the week of May 9 from Your Business, the Globe's home for entrepreneurs. Read our columnists, view archives of discussions, and connect through social media on the Your Business homepage.

    Read more


  • New lens needed on pensions 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    After five years of debate on pension reform, the long-term sustainability of our retirement system remains in doubt. The crux of the problem is that our notions about pension entitlement do not align with our ideas about aging.

    We regard the commencement of social security pensions at age 65 as a fundamental right while rejecting mandatory retirement at age 65 as discriminatory. These two beliefs are inconsistent and will eventually have to be reconciled.

    Read more


  • N.L. businesses fear postal strike 5/19/2011
    CBC News

    Businesses in central Newfoundland are worried about the possibility of Canada Post.

    The crown corporation's workers will be in a strike position May 24.

    Many Newfoundland and Labrador businesses rely on Canada Post to make money, according to the president of Gander's chamber of commerce, Dan Mahoney.

    Read more


  • Group targets Labrador internet blockage 5/19/2011
    CBC News

    A group in central Labrador is frustrated with a lack on internet service in the area.

    The Central Labrador Economic Development Board in Happy Valley-Goose Bay is calling on Bell Aliant and both the provincial and federal governments to help.

    Bell Aliant has the only network in the area, but it has stopped taking new customers because it is operating at capacity.

    Carol Best, a member of the board, said some professionals are leaving Happy Valley-Goose Bay because they can't get internet access at home.

    Read more


  • Is LinkedIn really worth more than $4-billion? 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    LinkedIn Corp. prices its initial public offering today amid questions amid questions surrounding the lofty valuation not only over the professional networking site, but of other social media concerns as well.

    Read more


  • Aboriginal engagement becomes a mining growth strategy 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Leanne Bellegarde tries to bridge worlds. She’s a member of the Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan, a lawyer, and now, the director of aboriginal strategy for Potash Corp of Saskatchewan Ltd.

    Native people are the youngest and fastest growing demographic in Saskatchewan. Potash Corp., a global potash producer in the province, projects it will need 800 new workers over the next two years, thanks to expansion and retirements.

    Read more


  • Will export restrictions on energy echo those on food? 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Higher prices are supposed to encourage more world supply. It’s standard textbook economics. But what happens when, instead of export-oriented global firms, it’s governments that control supply. They may not respond to price signals the same way as profit-maximizing companies. In fact, they may respond in the exact opposite way.

    Read more


  • Power shift to emerging economies by 2025: study 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    A new world order is looming, one that will reshape currency flows and tip power towards emerging markets like Indonesia and South Korea in the next decade and a half.

    By 2025, six major emerging economies -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, South Korea, and Russia -- will account for more than half of all global growth, a World Bank report predicted Tuesday.

    Read more


  • Online tools help investors find adviser right for them 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    You have questions, investment advisers have answers.

    So how come you don’t have an adviser?

    Maybe you’re skeptical, and with some justification, about whether advisers advise or just sell mutual funds. Or, maybe you simply don’t know how to find a good adviser. I know that’s an issue because one of the more common questions I get from readers is whether I can recommend a good adviser.

    Read more


  • Teen biz whiz reveals the secrets to his success 5/19/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Donny Ouyang, owner of Kinkarso Tech Ltd. and full-time student at the University of Toronto, has been named a 2011 Student Entrepreneur Ontario Champion by charitable organization, Advancing Canadian Entrepreneurship (ACE).

    Mr. Ouyang started his web consulting company, which develops for-profit Internet startups, in 2007. Over the past five to 10 months, he's been working on the company's flagship startup – Rayku.com – a peer micro-tutoring platform that allows students to share and ask for education help in real time. Once connected, the users are immediately placed in a live shared whiteboard environment, where the concepts in question can be communicated in a live chat setting.

    Read more


  • The new breed of financial bloggers: Young, frugal and vocal 5/19/2011
    Canadian Finance Blog

    My company puts financial education programs in the workplace. Here’s a sample of a very common response from people who have attended my workshop:

    “Jim was absolutely terrific. I wish I had taken this course years ago in my 20’s or 30’s and I probably would have retired 10 years earlier. This course should be mandatory for all employees in their 30’s. I wish my children could have dome to this course.”

    Read more


  • New Canadians missing jobs recovery 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Canada’s jobless rate is subsiding from elevated levels during the recession for most demographic groups except one -- recent immigrants.

    As of last month, the unemployment rate for Canadian-born people was 6.2 per cent, down from the same month a year earlier when it was 6.7 per cent. The jobless rate for all immigrants declined to 8.8 per cent from 9.9 per cent in April of last year, according to numbers crunched by the Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative.

    Read more




  • Vale appeals landmark environmental ruling 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Lawyers for Vale SA (VALE-N31.320.300.97%) head into a Toronto courtroom on Monday to appeal a groundbreaking class-action ruling that ordered the company to pay homeowners in Port Colborne, Ont., $36-million in compensation for decades of pollution from an Inco nickel refinery.

    The Brazilian mining giant, which took over Inco in 2006, is challenging a decision by Mr. Justice Joseph Henderson of the Ontario Superior Court that would see affected homeowners in the city of 18,000 compensated for the effect of the nickel pollution on their property values.

    Read more


  • Why America’s ‘zombie consumers’ won’t be coming back to life soon 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Economy watchers looking for a spark of life in the exhausted, debt-ridden American consumer are quick to latch on to any signs of a pulse.

    The latest came in the form of higher personal borrowing in March. The $6.02-billion (U.S.) increase marked the sixth consecutive monthly advance and was nearly three times higher than the most bearish forecasts. And the best news of all: Credit-card debt climbed, marking only the second such rise since the housing and credit market collapse.

    Read more




  • An entrepreneur measures success 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    I did my taxes last weekend. Aside from the aggravation of trying to locate old receipts and categorizing expenses, one of the biggest surprises was discovering how much money I made.

    As someone who is self-employed, I don't have a salary or receive a weekly or bi-weekly paycheque. It means I get paid when or if I get work.

    Read more




  • Young job-seekers struggling to get foot in the door 5/10/2011
    Financial Post

    At a time when the job market is picking up, many young Canadians between the ages of 15 and 24 are finding the recovery has moved on without them.

    In 2010, only three provinces (Newfoundland, PEI and Quebec) had increases in youth employment, said Roger Sauvé, author of the Vanier Institute for the Family’s The Current State of Canadian Family Finances 2010.

    Read more


  • Backtracking on HST would cost B.C. dearly 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Surreal is the only way to describe what’s happening on the HST front.

    British Columbia could wind up killing its harmonized sales tax and still keep all or part of the $1.6-billion Canadian taxpayers forked over to help the province adjust.

    Quebec, meanwhile, is in line to pocket $2.2-billion in compensation for a tax it willingly harmonized nearly two decades ago.

    Read more


  • Pension membership takes a heavy hit in private sector 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    For the first time, the majority of Canadians who have workplace pension plans are government employees, according to new data that highlight the growing disparity between private and public sector workers as the baby boom generation nears retirement.

    The recession, and in particular the massive job losses in factories that it caused, accelerated a long decline in pension plan membership in 2009. The number of private-sector workers with pension coverage declined by 2.1 per cent, Statistics Canada said, to just below three million.

    Read more


  • Wanted: clear thinking on educating the work force 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    In a recent column, I criticized Canadian universities for turning away up to half of applicants for in-demand programs such as engineering, information technology and health care, while continuing to allocate much of their money to programs with poor job prospects.

    That drew some indignant responses from supporters of liberal arts programs. One respondent, a Latin teacher with arts degrees in Latin, ancient Greek language and Greek tragedy, said employers “do not all want people who are trained seals and regurgitators ... who populate our science programs today.” Apparently the engineers responsible for designing the transportation systems, communication networks, medical imaging devices and other wonders of our technological age are simply “trained seals,” while medical researchers, physicians, technologists and those who learn specific skills are mere “regurgitators.”

    Read more


  • Why the race for a job just got slower 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    Employers are picking up their pace in hiring this year, but in the process, they’re getting much more picky.

    A new survey finds employers are demanding employees who are already experienced in their specific businesses and have a track record of achieving the results they want.

    One-third of the 184 large U.S. and Canadian employers polled by talent management specialists OI Partners Inc. said their hiring process is taking longer this year, in large part because they are conducting more interviews to confirm they are selecting the best candidates. Just 5 per cent said they are making hiring decisions more quickly than in the past.

    Read more


  • How the 'No Pants Subway Ride' spawned copycats 5/10/2011

    The Globe and Mail

    Imitation might be the sincerest form of flattery, but Charlie Todd is getting a little tired of being flattered.

    Mr. Todd is the 32-year-old founder of Improv Everywhere, a loose collective of performers – they prefer the term “agents” – who gather together every few weeks to perpetrate episodes of whimsy on random New Yorkers. One of their most famous events is the annual wintertime “No Pants Subway Ride,” in which groups of volunteers infiltrate the New York City transit system sans pantalons, to the quiet amusement of other riders.

    Read more


  • Do you have the 'green light' to retire? 5/10/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    I think we all know of people who retired but then changed their mind. What made them go back to work? What lessons can it teach to those who are now thinking about retirement?

    Many clients first come to a financial planner when they start to seriously consider retirement. They have a general idea that they want to retire in two or three years, but are typically nervous about whether they can afford it.

    Read more



  • Nine signs you can't afford a mortgage 5/3/2011
    Globe and Mail

    While plenty of individuals live from paycheque to paycheque, most consumers know they should be saving money and reducing debt. The recession has drummed that concept into everyone's head as people have watched their neighbours and friends lose jobs and sometimes their home.

    Many people say that money worries keep them awake at night, but that doesn't necessarily translate to imminent bankruptcy. How do you know when you are truly teetering on the edge of a financial disaster versus simply needing to do a little belt-tightening?

    Read more


  • The payoff for good saving habits 5/3/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When it comes to financial planning, Georgia has an advantage money can’t bestow.

    “My Dad taught me early to start saving for things,” she writes in an e-mail from her modest home in Kingston, Ont. She started contributing to a registered retirement savings plan when she was 16 years old and continues to tuck away the maximum each year.

    Read more



  • Exploration glory days 5/2/2011
    The Telegram

    First in a three-part series

    St. John’s harbour was a rig spotter’s paradise in the 1970s and 1980s — the era of the Hibernia, Terra Nova, White Rose and Hebron oilfield discoveries off Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Read more
     



  • Exploration in decline 5/2/2011
    The Telegram

    Second in a three-part series

    The more exploration wells drilled, the greater the chances of making that next big discovery — something the province’s offshore oil industry hasn’t seen since 1985 when White Rose was discovered.

    Read more




  • Turning the exploration tide 5/2/2011
    The Telegram

    Third in a three part series

    If the mantra in the real estate world is location, location, location, in the world of offshore oil and gas exploration it’s seismic, seismic, seismic.

    Read more


  • It takes time to make the most of social media 5/2/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    When Dave’s…on St. Clair launched last November in Toronto, the restaurant/bar faced two big challenges.

    One was to establish enough of a presence to make customers aware that it was open for business.

    The other was to make sure it wasn’t being mixed up with its predecessor, a pizza joint that had served cheap beer to customers who included what one patron on Chowhound.com described as a “sketchy crowd.”

    Read more



  • Ten ways to enhance your company's website with video 5/2/2011
    The Globe and Mail

    As demand for video increases across all platforms, the presence of quality video content on your businesses website is no longer a luxury.

    In 2010, 30 percent of all Internet traffic was video. In 2013, that number will increase to 90 per cent, according to research conducted by Cisco. The audience for video is growing rapidly, so what are you doing to make sure you aren’t hitting the gas in neutral?

    Read more



  • Worst time ever to dive into a new business 4/28/2011
    Globe and Mail

    There has never been a worse time to try to start a business.

    Why, you ask? Because there has never been a time in history where there has been more business competition. Ever.

    We have come off one of the most innovative centuries in all of time. Virtually everything imaginable, useful or not, has been thought of, as well as at least a dozen derivative products or services for each innovation. Read More



  • Leverage employees to get message out 4/28/2011
    Globe and Mail

    I was meeting with a potential new client this week, and before we got into the core elements of the meeting, she pulled out her new phone.

    She had been at a dinner party on the weekend, and a good friend of hers had just been given the same new device by her company, and she was showing off latest features over wine and dessert. My client went out and bought one the next day. Read more



  • Newly rich Newfoundland still enjoying perks of its ‘have-not’ past 4/25/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Anyone who still believes Newfoundland is a have-not province should take a close look at its latest budget.

    The province is forecasting budget surpluses of $485-million this year and $59-million next year. Yes, that’s black ink. The province is on a track to generate a combined $5-billion in surpluses between 2006 and 2012, according to its budget tabled last week. Read more.



  • Getting a client to pay up 4/25/2011
    Globe and Mail

    You do the work, send the invoice – and wait patiently for the client to pay the bill.

    Sometimes, it can take a few weeks, even a couple of months. You’re subject to the client’s payment policies and approach to managing cash flow.

    At the end of the day, however, when the cheque arrives and you cash it, everyone is happy. Read More



  • Did Canada's economy stall out in February? 4/25/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Economists believe Canada's economy stalled in February, while the United States hit a "temporary soft patch" in the first quarter.

    Markets are eyeing the latest data in both Canada and the U.S. this week. Statistics Canada reports Friday on gross domestic product for February, while the U.S. reading will be for the entire first quarter on Thursday. Read more




  • Far North residents weigh offshore drilling’s risk-reward equation 4/18/2011
    Globe and Mail

    The Beaufort Sea is home to bowhead whales and polar bears, great schools of Arctic char and vast numbers of migratory birds. It’s an important part of Canada’s northern iconography, a span of water that serves as the western terminus of the Northwest Passage and a harvesting ground for the small Inuit communities perched on its shores. Read more




  • Technology in investors’ spotlight 4/18/2011
    Globe and Mail

    The mobile gadget industry will dominate investor chatter this week, and not just because Research In Motion Ltd. is releasing its long-awaited tablet computer.

    On Wednesday, a day after RIM puts its BlackBerry PlayBook on store shelves in North America, Apple Inc. will release its fiscal second-quarter results. Analysts expect the company to post earnings per share of $5.35 (U.S.), compared with earnings of $3.33 during the same quarter a year ago, according to a Reuters survey. Read More



  • How to fix our retirement system 4/18/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Supplementary pension plans and new rules for banks? Pension expert Keith Ambachtsheer explains in this video.



  • Ten ways to stress test your business idea 4/18/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Try as you might, you can’t write a business plan for every idea you dream up. You need a set of questions that will help you filter or ‘stress test’ your ideas.

    Management guru Peter Drucker always focused on questions, suggesting that failure often resulted from not asking the right questions. Read more




  • The paradox of parity 4/18/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Many analysts are expecting oil prices to continue to rise in the medium term and for the Canadian dollar to continue to appreciate above parity with the U.S. dollar as oil prices rise. But if the past is any guide, what we may see instead is an exchange rate that stays near parity, even as the prices of oil and other commodities continue to rise.

    In the past decade, we have seen two episodes of sustained increases in oil prices. The first began in 2002 and ended with the financial crisis of 2008, and the current one began in January, 2009. In both cases, the Canadian dollar rose with oil prices in a fairly straight line, increasing by about 1 U.S. cent for each $2 (U.S.) increase in oil prices. Read more



  • Strategic elimination of the Payroll Tax 4/14/2011
    With the provincial budget set to be announced on Tuesday, the St. John’s Board of Trade is releasing information to support its advocacy work to eliminate the Health and Post-Secondary Education Tax, commonly referred to as the payroll tax.

    Learn more about the issue



     
  • Inside the issue: Fiscal and debt plan 4/13/2011
    The federal government carries a large debt accumulated from years of deficit, and government has gone back to deficit positions after a number of years of surpluses. According to the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, the federal government is adding $124 million a day to the national debt. At this rate, the $105-billion in debt repayment between 1997 and 2008 will be wiped out this year.

    Take a look at what’s behind the issue and what the stakes are and be better prepared to ask candidates their views when they knock on your doors.



  • Startup success: Make passion pay off 4/12/2011
    Globe and Mail

    Why do so many businesses fail? Too many entrepreneurs are snared by what author and consultant John Bradberry calls "the passion trap." The very thing that drives them is the very thing that can lead them astray, he says.

    "Passion provides courage, energy and optimism to propel you on your flight forward, but it also can blind and deafen you to helpful data and ideas. And it can lead you to believe that you’re somehow immune to typical startup risks that wise founders have learned to respect and manage," he writes in his new book, 6 Secrets to Startup Success. Read more



  • Fisheries Management 4/7/2011
    The candidates received their second policy brief from the Board of Trade earlier this week – this time on fisheries management. Take a look at what’s behind the issue and what the stakes are and be better prepared to ask candidates their views when they knock on your doors. Also, take our website poll so that we can push your issues with the federal candidates and parties.



     
  • Canada's power grid needs $293B infusion 4/7/2011
    CBC News

    Canada’s power grid will need an annual investment of $15 billion for the next 20 years in order to maintain aging facilities and meet rising demand, according to a report released Thursday.

    Canada’s Electricity Infrastructure: Building a Case for Investment, a study funded by the Canadian Electrical Association and conducted by the Conference Board of Canada, suggests that a total investment of $293.8 billion is necessary between now and 2030 to service old infrastructure and boost power generation from renewable sources like wind, solar and biomass energy.

    Read the full article and watch a short video.



  • Canada's demographic time bomb 4/4/2011

    Paul Vieira, Financial Post

    Lost in the political drama over the 2011 federal budget was a spending line item that starkly illustrates the fiscal squeeze posed by the aging population — an issue yet to be addressed during the 41st election campaign.

    As laid out in the budget, government spending on elderly benefits is set to surge 30% from 2010-11 levels to 2015-16, with annual increases of between 4.9% and 5.8%, well above projected rates of Canadian economic growth.

    Dig a bit deeper and the fiscal noose around Ottawa gets tighter. Read more about it.
     



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